BART contract on hold pending board vote

Gabrielle Lurie/Special to The S.F. ExaminerA broken section of rail that led to major BART delays could be from a batch of bad rail

Gabrielle Lurie/Special to The S.F. ExaminerA broken section of rail that led to major BART delays could be from a batch of bad rail

The “error” BART management claims to have made in signing off on the agreement between the transit agency and its unions has put hundreds of thousands of riders back in limbo until the board votes Thursday, and possibly in jeopardy of facing a third strike.

If the transit agency board rejects the tentative agreement — which BART officials say “inadvertently” includes a family medical leave provision giving workers up to six weeks of paid time off each year — the two major unions can strike again, assume negotiations, take legal action, or some or all of those options, according to Chris Daly, political director for Service Employees International Union Local 1021. Riders should be outraged, he said.

SEIU and Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1555 do not plan to choose a course of action until the board meeting, which they hope will result in approval of the contract.

Neither union has met since BART officials voted 7-1 on Friday night to release a statement expressing concerns at the potential cost of the leave provision. The board ordered the transit agency’s general manager to restart talks with union representatives.

“There has been no determination made to enter into negotiations,” said ATU president Antonette Bryant. “SEIU and ATU are going to be meeting some time this week.”

Even if the unions go back to the table, “with how brutal this contract negotiation has been and how terrible this latest fiasco is, it is very unlikely that either bargaining unit could get a positive vote on anything less than what has currently been voted,” Daly said.

“Hypothetically, if BART was willing to give more on safety, I could see giving something on [family medical leave],” he said. “But it’s got to be significant, or we might as well go back on strike.”

BART officials could not be reached for comment Sunday.

In an email to media Saturday night, BART Director Zakhark Mallett explained he was the lone dissenting vote on the motion to release the statement because it was “selectively transparent” on what led to the slip-up. </p>

“BART’s Board of Directors would more than likely have to vote ‘no’ on the contract in order to address this miscommunication-based clerical error,” Mallett revealed.

Daly was skeptical.

“The truth is they drafted it and when we pointed it out, they tried to throw one of their clerical people down under the bus,” he said.BARTBay Area NewsSEIU Local 1021StrikeTransittransportation

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

The sidewalk on Egbert Avenue in the Bayview recently was cluttered with car parts, tires and other junk. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
New surveillance effort aims to crack down on illegal dumping

’We want to make sure we catch people who are trashing our streets’

The recall election for California Gov. Gavin Newsom is scheduled for Sept. 14. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
SF could play a big role in overcoming Democrat apathy, driving voter turnout for Newsom

San Francisco voters are not used to swaying elections. Just think of… Continue reading

Health care workers treat a Covid-19 patient who needs to be intubated before being put on a ventilator at Providence St. Mary Medical Center during a surge of cases in Apple Valley, Dec. 17, 2020. Confronted with surging infections, California became the first state in the country to mandate coronavirus vaccines or testing for state employees and health-care workers. (Ariana Drehsler/The New York Times)
In California, a mix of support and resistance to new vaccine rules

By Shawn Hubler, Livia Albeck-Ripka and Soumya Karlamangla New York Times SACRAMENTO… Continue reading

Dave Hodges, pastor at Zide Door, the Church of Entheogenic Plants that include marijuana and psilocybin mushrooms, holds some psychedelic mushrooms inside the Oakland church on Friday, July 22, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Psychedelic spirituality: Inside a growing Bay Area religious movement

‘They are guiding us into something ineffable’

Most Read