Two new laws meant to reduce fare evasion go into effect Jan. 1, 2018. (S.F. Examiner file photo)

BART board adopts two new laws to combat fare evasion

Two laws were passed by the BART board of directors Thursday night requiring BART passengers to prove that they paid for their ride when authorized BART personnel ask them to do so, BART officials said.

The laws go into effect Jan. 1, 2018.

For the first month, people violating the law the first time will be given a warning rather than a citation.

Passengers inside the paid areas of the system will have to show authorized personnel either a valid ticket or Clipper Card when asked.

Inspections will occur in the paid part of the system including trains.

BART earns 74.4 percent of its operating revenue from fares and BART officials estimate that fare evaders cost the agency $15 to $25 million a year.

Police can issue a civil citation for first or second offenses that occur within a year. A criminal citation can be issued to adults who have received two or more civil citations in a year.

Children will only ever be given a civil citation.

Civil citations carry a fine of $75 for adults and $55 for minors. Criminal citations will not exceed $250.

Children can opt to perform community service rather than pay a fine.

Adults whose income is at or below 250 percent of the federal poverty level are also eligible to perform community service rather than pay a fine.

The second law establishes a civil fine and community service for children who enter or exit the system without processing their ticket or Clipper Card. Transit

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