Bank robber linked to cold case homicides booked into SF jail on suspicion of murder

A convicted bank robber who San Francisco police identified earlier this year as the suspect in two nearly 20-year-old cold case homicides was booked into County Jail over the weekend, according to jail records.

Roy Donovan Lacy, 37, is being held without bail on suspicion of two counts of murder months after police issued a warrant for his arrest in connection with the killings of a former college swimmer in 1999 and a gas station attendant in 2000.

The District Attorney’s Office was not immediately available to confirm whether Lacy has been charged with murder in the killings.

Lacy is suspected of stabbing 25-year-old Kameron Sengthavy, a former swimmer at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, at an apartment building on Bush Street between Grant Avenue and Kearny streets on the evening of Dec. 9, 1999.

He is also accused of shooting 60-year-old Thomas Lee at a gas station near Van Ness Avenue and Washington Street on the morning of June 1, 2000.

Homicide investigators working in the San Francisco Police Department Cold Case Unit identified Lacy as a suspect in the killings in early 2018.

Police have not said what new information led investigators to Lacy.

In May, police said Lacy would be extradited to San Francisco from a prison in Florida, where he was serving time for several bank robberies.

Lacy previously lived in the Bay Area. In January 2014, he was convicted of bank robbery in Marin County and sentenced to 105 years in prison for robbing banks in 2012 and 2013.

He was transferred from Florida to Marin County to stand trial and then sent back to Florida.

If Lacy is convicted in San Francisco, he still has to finish out a nine-year sentence for bank robbery in Florida and serve a 105-year sentence in Marin County.

mbarba@sfexaminer.com

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