Bank: Reiser withdrew $10K cash after wife disappeared

Murder defendant Hans Reiser engaged in a series of unusual banking transactions in the weeks after wife Nina disappeared on Sept. 3, 2006, a bank official said today.

Erin Morasch, an internal audit and security manager at Patelco Credit Union, where Reiser had several bank, credit card and debit card accounts, said Reiser, a 44-year-old computer engineer, withdrew a total of $10,000 in cash between Sept. 20 and 23 in 2006.

Among those transactions were withdrawals of $1,000 each inside branches in San Leandro, Hayward and Fremont between 12:16 p.m. and 1:47 p.m. on Sept. 23, 2006, which was a Saturday, Morasch said.

Those were followed up by four withdrawals of $500 each between 2:40 p.m. and 2:24 p.m. that day at an ATM machine at the Fremont branch, he said.

“It appears that Mr. Reiser drove from branch to branch to branch,” Morasch said.

He said, “It looks like a fraud pattern.”

Looking at all of Reiser's transactions for 2006, Morasch said Reiser's normal pattern was to use his credit card regularly and not have many cash transactions but that pattern was reversed in August and September, with few credit card transactions and many cash transactions.

Reiser is accused of murdering his estranged wife Nina even though her body has never been found, despite extensive searches in the Oakland hills and elsewhere.

Prosecutors allege that DNA and blood evidence proves that he killed her.

Nina, who was 31 at the time, was last seen alive on Sept. 3, 2006, after she dropped off the couple's two children at the house at 6979 Exeter Drive in the Oakland hills where Hans Reiser lived with his mother.

The couple married in 1999 but Nina filed for divorce and separated from Hans in 2004. They were in the midst of an acrimonious divorce and a battle over the custody of their children when she disappeared.

Hans Reiser has pleaded not guilty to the charges against him.

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