Bad news bank robber arrested after low-speed chase

A hard-luck bank robber was chased by construction workers and denied twice in carjacking attempts before police caught him this morning in a wild chase through San Francisco, Sgt. Neville Gittens said.

Sacramento resident David Bryant, 51, robbed a Wachovia bank at 200 Pine St. at 9:05 a.m., according to Gittens.

He allegedly jumped over the bank counter and grabbed an undisclosed amount of money from the cash register before fleeing on foot.

Bryant was seen running from the bank, dropping money as he went, according to witnesses. Trying to get away, he brandished a knife in an attempt to carjack a woman driving a Volvo on California Street, said Gittens. The woman drove away, but nearby construction workers saw the incident and began chasing Bryant.

They followed him down California Street and Bryant then tried to carjack the driver of a van, who also refused to give up his vehicle.

Bryant wasn't about to stop trying. At the intersection of Bush and Sansome streets, he allegedly stopped a cab and told the driver at knifepoint to take him to the Tenderloin neighborhood, according to Gittens.

Construction workers were not able to follow him beyond that point.

However, police were able to stop and arrest Bryant on Leavenworth Street at 9:15 a.m., according to Gittens.

He was charged with five counts of robbery, two counts of attempted car jacking, one count carjacking, and one count kidnapping.

— Bay City News

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