Bad dog: Poodle causes BART delay

Doggone BART was late again, boss.

No, really.

Trains were delayed about 10 minutes Thursday morning when a 10-pound black poodle hopped onto the tracks at Lake Merritt station in Oakland, spokesman Linton Johnson said.

The unattended pooch was on the train when it “decided to exit at Lake Merritt just like anyone on their way to work,” Johnson said. But then it took an unexpected shortcut, jumping onto the trackway in front of the train and headed into the tunnel toward the West Oakland station.

BART crews chased after him around 7:30 a.m., Johnson said.

“The poodle got lucky because he or she did not touch the electric third rail, which would have been the last thing he or she did,” he said.

The poodle even jumped to the other side of tracks and avoided the third rail, he added.

“A dog that has nine lives,” Johnson said.

The poodle or its owners were not found, Johnson said. Passengers delayed by the ordeal had an interesting excuse to offer their employers.

There is a lesson to this story, Johnson said. This is a prime reason why BART does not allow pets on trains unless they are in crates, he said. The transit agency does allow service animals, such as guide dogs for the blind, he added.

maldax@sfexaminer.com

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