A couple embraces near the scene in Oakland, Calif. Sunday, December 4, 2016 (Jessica Christian/S.F. Examiner)

A couple embraces near the scene in Oakland, Calif. Sunday, December 4, 2016 (Jessica Christian/S.F. Examiner)

Authorities ID 33 of 36 bodies in Oakland fire

Authorities said Monday they have tentatively identified 33 of the 36 people whose bodies have been found so far at the site of a warehouse that caught fire in Oakland’s Fruitvale district on Friday night.

In the latest update on the tragic fire at the “Ghost Ship” warehouse at 1305 31st Ave., Alameda County Sheriff Greg Ahern said 16 victims’ families have been notified of deaths and at least five more families were being notified Monday afternoon.

SEE RELATED: SF high school student killed in Oakland ‘Ghost Ship’ fire

Three of the victims who died were from out of the country, one each from Finland, Korea and Guatemala, Ahern said.

The Alameda County coroner’s bureau has completed 22 autopsies of the 36 victims found so far and more are planned in the coming days, Ahern said.

SEE RELATED: Crews resume search amid Oakland warehouse wreckage

Names of eight of the victims have been released and others will be released as their next of kin are notified.

Authorities believe the death toll will rise as recovery efforts resume in the wreckage of the warehouse, which caught fire around 11:30 p.m. Friday, Oakland Deputy Fire Chief Darin White said.

The recovery efforts were halted early Monday morning because of structural integrity issues at the front of building, White said. He said crews have searched through about 75 percent of the building as of Monday afternoon.

Heavy equipment, including a large crane, has been brought in to aid in the recovery efforts. Power was shut down to some PG&E customers midday and could remain shut off for up to 12 hours to allow the heavy equipment, which could hit power lines, to be moved in, Oakland police Officer Johnna Watson said.

Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf encouraged people to donate to funds for victims and their families.

The city’s three major sports teams, the Oakland Raiders, Oakland Athletics and Golden State Warriors, have donated $50,000 each to the victims.

A separate fund on the crowdfunding website YouCaring has collected more than $294,000 as of this morning. More information on the fund can be found at
https://www.youcaring.com/firevictimsofoaklandfiredec232016-706684.Bay Area News

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