AT&T sues SF over installation of utility boxes

MIKE KOOZMIN/ S.F. EXAMINER FILE PHOTOLegislation approved by the Board of Supervisors allows for community members to paint murals on utility boxes and requires AT&T to pay $1

MIKE KOOZMIN/ S.F. EXAMINER FILE PHOTOLegislation approved by the Board of Supervisors allows for community members to paint murals on utility boxes and requires AT&T to pay $1

AT&T filed a lawsuit against The City and its Public Works Department on Monday, in which the company alleges that The City has willfully denied it the permits it needs to install 26 utility boxes.

The lawsuit claims that city and state law require San Francisco either to approve the permit for a utility box installation or approve the permit for another, preferable location. “Instead, respondents have denied multiple applications on the ground that installation at another location would be more appropriate — without approving installation at any alternative location, and sometimes without even specifying where the supposedly better location might be,” the lawsuit states.

The lawsuit also alleges that the city has failed to respond to 67 permit applications within the required 60 day period. According to the document, this "unlawful conduct has deprived many citizens of San Francisco of access to low-cost, competitive video and broadband services.”

However, citizens of San Francisco have also opposed the utility boxes and the Board of Supervisors recently approved legislation authored by Supervisor Scott Wiener that would charge the telecommunications company $1,632 for the installation of each utility box.

The legislation also imposes fines and requires box removal if AT&T repeatedly fails to remove graffiti from the box. AT&T has planned installing 700 cabinets — 4 feet tall, 5 feet wide and 2 feet deep — for its U-verse service.AT&TBay Area NewsGovernment & PoliticslawsuitPoliticsutility box

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

San Francisco lacks housing data that would let it track rental vacancies and prices. New legislation is seeking to change that.<ins> (Photo by Joel Angel Jurez/2016 Special to S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Landlords blast proposal to require annual report on rentals as invasion of privacy

Housing inventory could give city better data on housing vacancies, affordability

University of San Francisco head coach Todd Golden coaches his team on defense during a 2019 gameat War Memorial Gymnasium on the campus of the University of San Francisco. (Ryan Gorcey / S.F. Examiner)
Stunner in Bubbleville: USF upsets fourth-ranked Virginia

Less than 48 hours removed from a loss to a feeble UMass… Continue reading

Health care workers would be the first group in the state to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. (Go Nakamura/Getty Images/TNS)
Hope on the way: Here’s what to know about California’s COVID-19 vaccine plan

The first batch of doses could hit the state as soon as early December

The Big Game was played Friday at Memorial Stadium in Berkeley. (Shutterstock)
Stanford blocks extra point to stun Cal, win 123rd Big Game 24-23

The 123rd edition of the Big Game featured a number of firsts.… Continue reading

Psilocybin magic mushrooms (Shutterstock)
‘Magic mushrooms’ moving into the mainstream

Efforts to decriminalize psychedelics could follow several different paths

Most Read