Assemblyman proposes new way to bet on horses

As the battle rages over the fate of the Bay Meadows Racecourse, Assemblyman Leland Yee, D-Daly City/San Francisco, is pushing for a new kind of gambling he says could help revive the ailing racetrack industry in California.

Assembly bill 2409 would allow racetrack visitors to participate in “instant horse racing,” where a patron uses a machine to wager on one of 250,000 historical horse races from the last 30 years, Yee’s spokesman Adam Keigwin said. After placing a wager — knowing only the horse’s statistics and odds — the customer could watch the original race on the machine.

The assemblyman and state senator-elect has not taken a position on the racetrack redevelopment project — which aims to turnthe track into an 83-acre mixed-use village, Keigwin said.

Nonetheless, the bill aims to make horse racing a viable business in California, even if it’s just in the meantime.

Some community groups, like Save Bay Meadows and Friends of Bay Meadows, hope the bill may save their beloved venue. But Adam Alberti, spokesman for track owner and developer Bay Meadows Land Company, said the company is committed to its redevelopment plans.

“As horse track owners, we are part of an industry that has been actively trying to find solutions to its bleak long-term economic future,” Alberti said. “We’re going to continue to advocate for solutions to the industry’s issues, but we’ve spent millions of dollars going through a long process to get our development plans approved.”

The Friends group has been in legal proceedings for months, hoping to eventually get the San Mateo County Superior Court’s OK for a November referendum that could reverse the City Council’s unanimous approval of the racetrack’s redevelopment.

AB 2409 will be considered on Tuesday in the Senate Governmental Organization Committee.

tramroop@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

Just Posted

California Highway Patrol officers watch as Caltrans workers remove barricades from homeless camp sites as residents are forced to relocate from a parking lot underneath Interstate 80 on Monday, May 17, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
San Francisco’s broken promise to resolve homeless encampments

‘There is an idea that The City is leading with services, and they are not’

Gabriela Lopez, Alison Collins and Faauuga Moliga were sworn in to the Board of Education on Jan. 7, 2019. The election date for their possible recall is Feb. 15, 2022. (Ida Mojadad/S.F. Examiner)
The silver lining of San Francisco’s ‘recall fever’

Recalls are an expensive but valuable amplifier for everyday people

The Department of Building Inspection, at 49 South Van Ness Ave., has been mired in scandal since since its creation by voter referendum under Proposition G in 1994. (Courtesy SF.gov)
The Department of Building Inspection, at 49 South Van Ness Ave., has been mired in scandal since its creation by voter referendum under Proposition G in 1994. (Courtesy SF.gov)
Whistleblowing hasn’t worked at San Francisco’s Department of Building Inspection

DBI inspectors say their boss kept them off connected builders’ projects

FILE — Mort Sahl on Nov. 10, 1967. Sahl, who confronted Eisenhower-era cultural complacency with acid stage monologues, delivering biting social commentary in the guise of a stand-up comedian and thus changing the nature of both stand-up comedy and social commentary, died on Tuesday, Oct. 26, 2021, at his home in Mill Valley, Calif., near San Francisco. He was 94. (Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times)
Legendary local comedian dies at 94

By Bruce Weber NYTimes News Service Mort Sahl, who confronted Eisenhower-era cultural… Continue reading

Most Read