Mike Koozmin/the S.F. ExaminerArthur Tyler

Mike Koozmin/the S.F. ExaminerArthur Tyler

Arthur Tyler, former Compton College head, tapped to lead CCSF through accreditation battle

Arthur Tyler, a 20-year Air Force veteran and and the man who for a brief time led the now-defunct Compton Community College District, has been chosen as the new chancellor for City College of San Francisco, according sources familiar with hiring efforts.

“I will be at the press conference tomorrow,” Tyler said of Wednesday’s official announcement, scheduled for 10:30 a.m. at the Ocean Avenue campus.

CCSF special trustee Robert Agrella and California Community Colleges Chancellor Brice Harris are expected to attend as well.

Tyler was deputy chancellor and chief operating officer of the Houston Community College System until he resigned in August. Before that, he was Sacramento City College’s president and vice president of administration and finance at Los Angeles City College.

Tyler, 63, was appointed by the state as a special trustee of Compton Community College in 2004. In June 2005, the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges announced that Compton would lose its accreditation. A month later, the state replaced Tyler.

The college closed in 2006.

Tyler’s military career included being the anti-terrorism manager for the Air Force and an adviser to two commanders in chief responsible for U.S. activities in the Middle East.

Last week, three finalists came to the campus for a series of public forums. Candidates Stephen Curtis and Terry Calaway did not return calls for comment Tuesday.

The college paid consultants the ELS Group $47,500 to conduct the search.

In July, the accrediting panel announced that CCSF would lose its accreditation if it does not transform itself into a viable institution. And unless officials can successfully appeal the decision by July, the college, which serves roughly 85,000 students, will lose its accreditation and effectively close.

Agrella, who was appointed in October 2012 with veto power over accreditation issues, was given near total power in July by the California Community Colleges board of governors after it stripped CCSF’s elected board of trustees of its powers.

Bay Area NewsCCSFCCSF accreditationCity College of San Franciscoeducation

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