Arrest made in fatal shooting of Emmett Bryon in Tenderloin

Google mapsLeonard Colvin has been arrested in connection with the shooting death of Emmett Byron near Turk and Leavenworth streets on July 20.

Google mapsLeonard Colvin has been arrested in connection with the shooting death of Emmett Byron near Turk and Leavenworth streets on July 20.

Leonard Colvin, 41, has been arrested on murder charges in connection with the shooting death of Emmett Byron in the Tenderloin district nearly three months ago, police said today.

Byron, 39, was shot on the 200 block of Turk Street near Leavenworth Street about 11:40 p.m. on July 20.

He was transported to San Francisco General Hospital with gunshot wounds to his arm and upper torso. He died from his injuries at the hospital about a month later.

Soon after the shooting, police reported that Byron was uncooperative with the investigation. Police took Colvin into custody on Monday but have not said what led to the arrest.

A motive for the shooting has not been released.

Colvin was charged with one count of murder and one count of being a felon in possession of a firearm, Assistant District Attorney Alex Bastian said. Colvin did not enter a plea in his first court appearance on the charges Thursday. A judge set his bail at $5 million, Bastian said.

The investigation is ongoing, Sgt. Danielle Newman said of the case. Anyone with further information is encouraged to contact the police department’s Homicide Detail at (415) 553-1145 or the Anonymous Tip Line at (415) 575-4444. Messages can also be sent via mobile phone to Text a Tip at TIP411, with the message beginning with “SFPD.”

Since the homicide, efforts have been made to clean up Turk Street, where drug-dealing and violence are commonplace. And operation conducted last week by Tenderloin Station officers involved forcing loiterers in the area to disperse so that Department of Public Works crews could wash down the sidewalks.

Officers offered services to some folks, and busted others for drug-dealing.

“Unbeknownst to the dealers, Tenderloin officers had been taking up positions on nearby rooftops and windows knowing that once DPW moved on, the dealers would be back,” Lt. Carl Fabbri said in a community newsletter. “The dealers came back within minutes.”

There were not only several arrests during the weeklong operation, but three instances in which suspected dealers led officers on a foot chase, Fabbri added.

Bay Area NewsCrimeCrime & CourtsEmmett ByronLeonard ColvinTenderloin

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