Apps help track drinkers' ability to drive — or not

Michal Czerwonka/Getty ImagesPresident of Electronic Arts Sports (EA Sports) Peter Moore talks about new games at an EA press briefing ahead of the Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) at the Orpheum Theater June 14

Michal Czerwonka/Getty ImagesPresident of Electronic Arts Sports (EA Sports) Peter Moore talks about new games at an EA press briefing ahead of the Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) at the Orpheum Theater June 14

Before getting behind the wheel after a night out, a driver can test his blood alcohol level with new apps that not only give a reading but can call a cab.

Breathometer, for iPhones and Android smartphones, and BACtrack, for iPhones, display a user's blood alcohol level within seconds on smartphone-connected breathalyzers.

“People think, 'Oh, I'm driving around the corner,' but it's not until they get pulled over that they realize they're over the limit,” said Charles Michael Yim, chief executive of Breathometer, based in Burlingame.

Yim said his company's aim is to prevent drunken driving by raising awareness of alcohol levels and enabling drivers to make smarter decisions.

The Breathometer plugs into a smartphone's headphone jack, and the user blows on the device. The BACtrack connects to the iPhone via Bluetooth. Both use sensors that meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration standards and can detect blood alcohol levels with accuracy within 0.01 percent, according to the companies.

Breathalyzers have been around since the 1950s. By pairing them with smartphones and making them smaller and more cost effective, more people will be able to use them, Yim said.

“We are catering to a completely different audience that wouldn't have considered buying one before,” he said.

Breathometer's breathalyzer is the size of a car key and fits into a pocket or on a key chain. The app can detect a user's GPS location, order a cab if the user can't drive home, and estimate how long it will take for the user to become sober.

The app, which costs $49, will be released worldwide in October on the Internet and in stores the following month.

San Francisco-based BACtrack, founded in 2001, was the first company to receive U.S. government clearance to sell breathalyzers for personal use. Its breathalyzer, which includes a mouthpiece, costs $150.

Bay Area NewsBreathometerBurlingamePeninsulaSan Francisco

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