Russel A. Daniels/2009 AP file photoWant to skip the crowds this Black Friday? There's an app for that.

Russel A. Daniels/2009 AP file photoWant to skip the crowds this Black Friday? There's an app for that.

Apps help people find the shopping deals

A San Francisco company’s app is among those that Black Friday shoppers who want to avoid long lines can download to help them shop for bargains from the comfort of their own homes.

Whether it is getting notifications about items going on sale, shopping from print magazines and fliers, or turning email promotions into shopping magazines, apps are helping shoppers find deals.

Shop It To Me, a new free app for the iPhone, allows shoppers to track when their favorite clothing items or brands go on sale in their size at online retailers.

“On Black Friday, every store is going to shove sales in your face and it can be so overwhelming that you might miss out on an item you actually want,” said Charlie Graham, chief executive officer of Shop It To Me, based in San Francisco.

The app acts like a personal shopping assistant, constantly scouring hundreds of online retailers such as Nordstrom, Bloomingdale’s, Banana Republic and J.Crew for the latest deals based on the shoppers’ preferences and sizes.

Hukkster for the iPhone also lets shoppers track their favorite items and sales. With a new feature on the free app, users worldwide can also put in the item number of merchandise they find in stores and track when they go on sale.

ShopAdvisor, a free app for iPhone, Android and Windows Phone, tracks items consumers find in print and tablet magazines.

“Often we’ll see deals online prior to and after Black Friday that can be just as good, if not better, than those we see in store,” said Karen Macumber, chief marketing officer of ShopAdvisor, based in Boston.

Another app called Sift takes a different approach, letting users browse promotions in their email inboxes.

“People’s email is filled with shopping promotions. Some of our users receive as many as 3,000 to 4,000 shopping emails a year,” said Saurin Shah, CEO of Sift, based in Burlingame.

The free app also learns about shoppers’ preferences from their emails to help them discover new products in the company’s database of more than a million products.Bay Area NewsBlack FridayShop It To Me

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