Anti-graffiti coursework starts in schools

There’s a big difference between art and vandalism – and the former is certainly more productive than the latter.

That’s the key lesson in new anti-graffiti courses being implemented at six San Francisco Unified School District schools.

The new curriculum is aimed at teaching students between grades four and six the negative effects of graffiti in neighborhoods. The idea is to redirect the creative energy that would go into tagging a bus shelter into the creation of artwork that doesn’t cost millions of dollars in taxpayer money to clean up, according to the San Francisco Arts Commission.

The City spends more than $20 million annually cleaning up graffiti, according to estimates.

The Arts Commission is piloting the program alongside the Department of Public Works, the agency that is responsible for cleaning graffiti off city property.

Class instruction kicks off today at Jean Parker Elementary School, the Arts Commission said. Three fifth grade classes will participate in an assembly led by artist and community activist Cameron Moberg, who “will teach a series of lessons that combine educational information about illegal vandalism and graffiti with positive artist-led activities.”

Courses will also begin this fall at Paul Revere Elementary School. Four more schools, including Mckinley, Bret Harte, Martin Luther King, Jr. and John Muir, “will begin coursework with urban artists on lessons and mural painting during the spring 2010 semester,” the Arts Commission said in a statement.

The pilot program is formerly called, “Where Art Lives.”

“With our very limited budget, it has been extremely difficult for the Arts Commission to respond to the unprecedented increase of graffiti and vandalism on The City’s public monuments over the last couple of years,” said Luis R. Cancel, director of Cultural Affairs for the San Francisco Arts Commission, in a statement.
 

Bay Area NewsSan Francisco Unified School DistrictschoolsUnder the Dome

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

A health care worker receives one of the first COVID-19 vaccine doses at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital on Tuesday Dec. 15, 2020. (Courtesy SFgov)
SF to open three large sites for COVID-19 vaccinations

Breed: ‘We need more doses. We are asking for more doses’

Tongo Eisen-Martin, a Bernal Heights resident, named San Francisco’s eighth poet laureate. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Tongo Eisen-Martin becomes San Francisco’s eighth poet laureate

Bernal Heights resident Tongo Eisen-Martin has become San Francisco’s eighth poet laureate.… Continue reading

Homeless people's tents can be seen on Golden Gate Avenue in the Tenderloin on Wednesday afternoon, Dec. 16, 2020. (Photo by Ekevara Kitpowsong/S.F. Examiner)
Statewide business tax could bring new funds to combat homelessness

San Francisco could get more than $100 million a year for housing, rental assistance, shelter beds

The Museum of the African Diaspora in San Francisco (a mural by artist Jamie Treacy is pictued) has a lineup of free online programming including activities for youngsters scheduled for Martin Luther King Jr. Day on Jan. 18. (Courtesy Demetri Broxton/Museum of the African Diaspora)
Stanford, Museum of the African Diaspora host MLK Day activities

Online offerings include films, music, discussion

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi presides the US House of Representatives vote on the impeachment of US President Donald Trump at the US Capitol, January 13, 2021, in Washington, DC. - The Democrat-controlled US House of Representatives on January 13 opened debate on a historic second impeachment of President Donald Trump over his supporters' attack of the Capitol that left five dead. (SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images/TNS)
House votes 232-197 to impeach Trump a second time

Focus shifts to Senate, where McConnell has signaled he may not stand by president

Most Read