Another candidate throws hat in ring for mayor’s race

The race for San Francisco mayor is on.

Joanna Rees on Wednesday launched an exploratory campaign for mayor of San Francisco after filing papers with the Department of Elections. Rees, a self-described education advocate, said her campaign will target jobs, jobs, jobs.

The entrepreneur and mother of two, also plans to champion education as the leader of San Francisco. Rees teaches at Santa Clara University and has served for eight years on the Bay Area Board of the Network for Teaching Entrepreneurship, which brings business-building skills to students in low-income communities.

She also serves on the board of the New Schools Venture Fund, which helps education entrepreneurs across the nation. “Walking through our city’s diverse neighborhoods, I recognize that many people are struggling to make their way,” Rees said. “I see too many empty storefronts and too many talented people leaving the city every day for better opportunities down the Peninsula and across the Bay. Our residents deserve the opportunity to pursue well paying jobs here. Creating those jobs for all San Franciscans has to be the number one priority for the next Mayor.”

City Attorney Dennis Herrera last week announced his bid for mayor, joining Supervisor Bevan Dufty in the race.

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