Anniversary will not bring more security

Bay Area transit agencies are taking no special precautions for commuters on the fifth anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, but travelers are encouraged to be the first line of defense in the war on terror.

With national threat levels at yellow, or “elevated,” officials with the Golden Gate Transit Authority, Bay Area Rapid Transit, San Francisco International Airport and Caltrain said they would not increase security today, citing measures they’ve taken since the World Trade Center and Pentagon attacks.

Golden Gate spokeswoman Mary Currie said they would continue operating steadily at a “yellow-plus, orange-minus” alert level — in between the Department of Homeland Security’s yellow and orange alerts — as they have since Sept. 11, 2001.

“We’re at a higher level because we feel as the iconic structure we are … it’s our responsibility,” Currie said.

The agency has improved the perimeter security at bus and ferry terminals and looks forward to the November completion of the Golden Gate Bridge’s north end security project, which adds more fencing, lighting and roadway barricades, she said.

After the enhancements made in the wake of the foiled British bomb plot involving liquid explosives, Bob Rotiski, the duty managerat SFO, said there was no need to increase security measures today because “we’re doing what we need to be doing” and complying with current security directives.

Caltrain was not stepping up security but continuing with the normal levels of transit police and K-9 units while working closely with the municipalities its tracks run through, said spokesman Jonah Weinberg.

Bay Area Rapid Transit officials are using the anniversary as an opportunity to remind riders and citizens that they are the best defense against would-be attackers, noting that if “something negative” happened to the BART system, the ranking director of BART, James Fang, said it could cost $20 billion to replace it.

“Police, just as before 9/11 and since, cannot be everywhere,” added BART’s chief of police, Gary Gee.

It’s those types of statements — reminding people that it’s an open system — that 36-year-old commuter Keith Goldman said gives security officials a fall-back position in the case of attack.

“That just reinforces to me that there’s only so much you can do,” said the twice-weekly BART rider.

dsmith@examiner.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

A cable car on the Powell-Hyde line ascends Russian Hill at Hyde and Chestnut streets. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Streetcars and cable cars to return later this year

F-line coming back in May, while Powell/Hyde will be restored in the Fall

Mayor London Breed announces The City’s return to the red tier for COVID-19 precautions at Pier 39 on Tuesday, March 2, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
San Francisco enters red COVID tier, indoor dining to resume

Museums and gyms can reopen with capacity limits

Cities including San Francisco, Oakland and Berkeley are calling for large grocery and drug store chains to pay employees hazard pay for working during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Shutterstock)
SF proposes $5 hazard pay law for grocery, drug store workers

San Francisco may soon join the growing number of cities requiring large… Continue reading

San Francisco workers who are members of the International Federation of Professional and Technical Engineers are calling for The City’s retirement board system to stop investing in Chevron. <ins>(Shutterstock)</ins>
SF should step up efforts to divest from fossil fuels

Retirement fund continues to include big oil companies

The deYoung Museum will reopen to the public March 6 with an exhibition of works by Alexander Calder and Pablo Picasso. (Courtesy Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco)
de Young Museum to reopen with ‘Calder-Picasso’

With COVID-19 restrictions lifting, The City’s museums and cultural institutions are reopening.… Continue reading

Most Read