Gabrielle Lurie/Special to the S.f. ExaminerThe San Francisco Board of Supervisors voted not to take an official stand in support of nationwide protests

Gabrielle Lurie/Special to the S.f. ExaminerThe San Francisco Board of Supervisors voted not to take an official stand in support of nationwide protests

Amid police criticism, supervisors back off resolution supporting protests

Protests have erupted around the nation in reaction to the killings of black men by police and the failure of grand juries to indict the officers responsible. The deaths of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., and Eric Garner in New York City have drawn calls for solidarity to stand up against police violence and acknowledge racism in society.

But on Tuesday, the Board of Supervisors decided not to take an official stand in support of the nationwide movement, even as Michael Brown Sr., the father of the Ferguson victim, had paid a visit to San Francisco.

“That's all we're doing, is standing up for our rights,” Brown said Sunday to those gathered at the Third Baptist Church.

Supervisor John Avalos had introduced the resolution in support of the protests, calling for a “commitment to equal justice.”

But the language angered the Police Officers Association, whose leadership said it contained “disparaging remarks” painting some police as “as being either racist or trigger happy.”

Avalos, however, said the symbolic resolution does no such thing. Even after amending the language to soften its tone, Avalos still faced resistance from his colleagues. He could only gain support from supervisors Eric Mar, Jane Kim and David Campos. Campos said improvement won't happen “unless we are actually acknowledging there is a need for that work.” Avalos and his three supporters refused to make additional changes.

Supervisor Malia Cohen, for example, wanted to eliminate any reference of Alex Nieto, a Latino man killed by police officers March 21 when he was shot at least 10 times. An investigation is ongoing and the names of officers involved have yet to be released.

“We are not Ferguson,” said Supervisor London Breed, who spoke of having a strong relationship with local police officers. “I am not comfortable with a comparison of our local law enforcement to what's happening in Ferguson.”

Bay Area NewsBoard of SuprvisorsFergusonGovernment & PoliticsJohn AvalosPolitics

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Board of Supervisor President Norman Yee. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Supes ban tobacco smoking in apartments but exempt cannabis

San Francisco banned smoking and vaping of tobacco in apartments Tuesday night,… Continue reading

Dr. Grant Colfax and Mayor London Breed said new restrictions could come this week due to rising COVID-19 cases.<ins> (Examiner screenshot)</ins>
Breed: ‘More restrictive action’ needed to slow spread of COVID-19

San Francisco officials said Tuesday tougher restrictions will soon be imposed to… Continue reading

Many landlords fought the proposal requiring them to register properties, calling it an invasion of privacy. 
Kevin N. Hume/
S.F. Examiner
Housing inventory wins unanimous approval from supervisors

Legislation will require landlords to register properties, report vacancies and rents

Harlan Kelly, head of the SFPUC and husband to City Administrator Naomi Kelly (right), faces federal charges for allegedly trading inside information on a city contract in return for a paid family vacation. (Courtesy photo)
Harlan Kelly, head of SFPUC, charged with fraud in widening Nuru scandal

Kelly accused of engaging in corrupt partnership with permit expediter

Jeff Tumlin, director of transportation for the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, said the agency’s fiscal situation is “far worse” than the worse case scenarios projected back in April. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
SFMTA prepares for massive potential layoffs as budget crisis continues to build

More than 1,200 full-time jobs on the line as agency struggles to close deficit

Most Read