Gabrielle Lurie/Special to the S.f. ExaminerThe San Francisco Board of Supervisors voted not to take an official stand in support of nationwide protests

Gabrielle Lurie/Special to the S.f. ExaminerThe San Francisco Board of Supervisors voted not to take an official stand in support of nationwide protests

Amid police criticism, supervisors back off resolution supporting protests

Protests have erupted around the nation in reaction to the killings of black men by police and the failure of grand juries to indict the officers responsible. The deaths of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., and Eric Garner in New York City have drawn calls for solidarity to stand up against police violence and acknowledge racism in society.

But on Tuesday, the Board of Supervisors decided not to take an official stand in support of the nationwide movement, even as Michael Brown Sr., the father of the Ferguson victim, had paid a visit to San Francisco.

“That's all we're doing, is standing up for our rights,” Brown said Sunday to those gathered at the Third Baptist Church.

Supervisor John Avalos had introduced the resolution in support of the protests, calling for a “commitment to equal justice.”

But the language angered the Police Officers Association, whose leadership said it contained “disparaging remarks” painting some police as “as being either racist or trigger happy.”

Avalos, however, said the symbolic resolution does no such thing. Even after amending the language to soften its tone, Avalos still faced resistance from his colleagues. He could only gain support from supervisors Eric Mar, Jane Kim and David Campos. Campos said improvement won't happen “unless we are actually acknowledging there is a need for that work.” Avalos and his three supporters refused to make additional changes.

Supervisor Malia Cohen, for example, wanted to eliminate any reference of Alex Nieto, a Latino man killed by police officers March 21 when he was shot at least 10 times. An investigation is ongoing and the names of officers involved have yet to be released.

“We are not Ferguson,” said Supervisor London Breed, who spoke of having a strong relationship with local police officers. “I am not comfortable with a comparison of our local law enforcement to what's happening in Ferguson.”

Bay Area NewsBoard of SuprvisorsFergusonGovernment & PoliticsJohn AvalosPolitics

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Chelsea Hung, who owns Washington Bakery and Restaurant in Chinatown with her mother, said the restaurant is only making about 30 percent of pre-pandemic revenues. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Chinatown’s slow recovery has business owners fearing for the future

Lack of outside visitors threatens to push neighborhood into ‘downward spiral’

San Francisco Symphony Music Director Esa-Pekka Salonen and members of the orchestra were thrilled to be back inside Davies Symphony Hall on May 6 in a program for first responders featuring string works by Jean Sibelius, George Walker, Carl Nielsen, Caroline Shaw and Edward Grieg. (Courtesy Stefan Cohen/San Francisco Symphony)
SF Symphony makes joyful return to Davies Hall

Esa-Pekka Salonen conducts program for first responders and community leaders

Students in an after-school community hub move quickly through a social circle as they play a game at the Mission YMCA on Friday, May 7, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Parents scramble for ‘Summer Together’ spaces

City program offering free camps sees high demand, confusion over enrollment

Jazz pianist and composer Jon Jang is an instructor at Community Music Center in the Mission District. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Jon Jang composes bittersweet symphonies

Musician-activist’s works are steeped in civil rights history

Calfire (Shutterstock)
Wildfires burn around Northern California during first red flag weekend of the year

Firefighters around the region battled wildfires all day Saturday, starting less than… Continue reading

Most Read