AP Photo/Vicki BehringerThis artist rendering shows Ross William Ulbricht

Alleged drug kingpin to be hauled to N.Y. for charges

A federal judge on Wednesday ordered a San Francisco man charged with operating a notorious online drug marketplace known as Silk Road to be sent to New York to face charges.

Ross William Ulbricht, 29, agreed to remain in custody, waiving his right to argue for release on bail.

His public defender, Brandon LeBlanc, said Ulbricht will be transferred immediately and might argue for release once he reaches New York, where he is charged with three felonies related to the website, including solicitation of murder.

Silk Road gained widespread notoriety two years ago as a black-market bazaar where visitors could buy and sell drugs using bitcoins, a form of online cash. A so-called hidden site, Silk Road used an online tool known as Tor to mask the location of its servers.

The FBI shut down the site when agents arrested Ulbricht on Oct. 1 at the Glen Park Branch Library in San Francisco as he chatted online with a cooperating witness, according to authorities and court papers.

Ulbricht is accused of operating Silk Road under the alias “Dread Pirate Roberts” and earning $80 million from commissions on all sales.Bay Area NewsCrimeCrime & CourtsFBIRoss William UlbrichtSilk Road

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