All lanes open after water main break in SoMA

All lanes of traffic in a SoMA intersection reopened around midnight after a 100-year-old water main ruptured and pulverized about 40 square feet of roadway over the weekend.

A 16-inch-wide pipe that pumps millions of gallons of water a day into the Potrero neighborhood broke around 8:30 p.m. Saturday. The pressure caused the road to crumble, creating an 8-feet-deep pit at the intersection at Division and Brannan streets, about 3 feet worth of flooding above ground and several road closures.

Initially four intersections were blocked to isolate the area, but as of Sunday at least one lane of traffic in each direction was open on corresponding roadways.

By midnight Tuesday the pit had been filled, the road was repaired and all the lanes were reopened, said San Francisco Public Utilities Commission spokesman Tyrone Jue.

The utilities commission had crews working around the clock to replace a 5-foot segment of the pipe – at least a couple of hundred pounds – and have it fluid again by 3 p.m. Sunday.

The concrete along the sidewalk of the intersection was still taped off Tuesday morning, but will likely be open by tomorrow, Jue said.

The utilities commission is investigating the rupture but has speculated it was because of its age and the cold weather.

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