(Courtesy photo)

(Courtesy photo)

Airbnb scores victory, as Prop. F fails

Home-sharing in San Francisco will not face stricter regulations, at least in the near future.

In a major victory for home-sharing companies like Airbnb, Proposition F, which would have capped nightly stays at 75 per year and allowed The City to fine Airbnb and other hosting websites for listing unregistered rentals, appears to have lost. Roughly 55 percent of voters said no to the measure, compared to 45 percent who supported it.

“I feel really good that the voters of San Francisco recognized that it wasn’t what it was purported to be,” said No on F’s Campaign Manager Patrick Hannan, who called Prop. F a “fairytale.”

Assemblyman David Chiu, D-San Francisco, also thanked those who voted to not support the measure. “Because of you we won’t have neighbors spying on other neighbors,” Chiu told more than a hundred revelers at No on F’s election party inside South of Market’s Oasis nightclub. “City government will have millions of more dollars because of you.”

San Francisco already regulates short-term rentals, but Prop. F supporters noted the current law lacks registration. Proponents also said the measure would have restored thousands of rental units to the market amid The City’s drastic housing crisis.

The defeat of Prop. F is a significant win for short-term rental companies like Airbnb, which spent millions of dollars in recent weeks and months to dissuade voters from supporting the proposition.

Those against the measure had argued it was too extreme and would hurt neighborhood merchants, who are said to benefit from expanding tourism.

Middle-income residents who rent an extra room to help make ends meet also would have been impacted by the passage of Prop. F, according to opponents.

AirBnBProp FProposition F

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

U.S. Attorney David Anderson announces federal firearms charges against two men for their roles in a March 2019 shooting outside the Fillmore Heritage Center in a news conference alongside SFPD staff at the Phillip Burton Federal Building on Thursday, Jan. 9, 2020. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Departing U.S. attorney predicts corruption probe will continue

David Anderson shook up City Hall as top federal prosecutor

Board of Supervisors President Shamann Walton, a former school board member, has been asked to help secure an agreement between the school district and teacher’s union. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
 <ins></ins>
Supervisor Walton tapped to mediate teacher contract talks

District and union at odds over hours in-person students should be in the classroom

California is set to receive supplies of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, which is still under review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. (Courtesy photo)
California could receive 380K doses of new J&J COVID vaccine next week

California could receive 380,300 doses of the new Johnson & Johnson vaccine… Continue reading

Disability advocates protested outside the home of San Francisco Health Officer Tomas Aragon. (Courtesy Brooke Anderson)
Vaccine rollout plan for people with disabilities remains deeply flawed

On February 13, disability activists paid a visit to the house of… Continue reading

A Bay Area Concrete Recycling facility that opened on PG&E property in 2019. Former PG&E employees have been accused of accepting bribes from Bay Area Concrete. (Courtesy of Bay Area Concrete Recycling via ProPublica)
Lawsuit reveals new allegations against PG&E contractor accused of fraud

By Scott Morris Bay City News Foundation Utility giant Pacific Gas &… Continue reading

Most Read