Air district announces Spare the Air night

The Bay Area Air Quality Management District has issued a Spare the Air Tonight advisory and is requesting residents avoid burning wood and driving this evening.

This is the third Spare the Air Tonight this winter, according to air quality officials. An advisory is issued when air quality is expected to be unhealthy.

The forecast calls for particulate pollution to reach unhealthy concentrations, according to the Bay Area Air Quality Management District.

To help bring the air back down to healthy levels, Bay Area residents are being asked to avoid burning wood in fireplaces and wood stoves tonight through Friday morning.

“Wood smoke is a significant public health concern,” said Bay Area Air Quality Management District Executive Officer Jack Broadbent in a prepared statement. “Wood burning is the single largest source of wintertime particulate pollution in the Bay Area, and the easiest for residents to control.”

Particles found in wood smoke can cause serious respiratory problems, especially for youth, the elderly and those with a history of respiratory or cardiovascular problems, Bay Area Air Quality Management District officials said.

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