Affordable housing is ready to move ahead

Families in need of a home got a boost from county supervisors Tuesday when they unanimously approved funds for one of the county’s largest low-income housing developments.

Supervisors on Tuesday approved $8.6 million of a total $10 million in county subsidies for the $47 million, 130-unit project on El Camino Real across from the Colma BART station, by developer Bridge Housing, officials said.

“What we’re doing is getting affordable housing in the community faster and that’s what we need right now,” Board of Supervisors President Jerry Hill said.

County housing director Duane Bay said the project is among the largest subsidized by the county and would contribute significantly to the 1,820 affordable units currently in the affordable housing pipeline.

The need for such a large subsidy was driven by the high number of units and the “deep affordability,” Bay said. The development is being designed for families with incomes from around $25,000 to $48,000 a year, said project manager Ben Metcalf of Bridge Housing.

The five-story project will include landscaped courtyards, a community room, one floor of parking and a child care center for about 60 children, Metcalf said.

Bridge also intends to partner with another development to build about 30 townhomes, envisioned to be starter homes adjacent to the apartment complex.

“This project will be one more key element to changing that area around BART into a pedestrian-friendly neighborhood with street life,” Metcalf said.

It will also contribute to Colma and the county’s vision of the “Grand Boulevard” plan for El Camino Real, he said.

ecarpenter@examiner.comBay Area NewsLocal

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