Administration in cross hairs for district cuts

Proposed $1.4 million cuts could potentially cost a school district its top administrators and the city’s residents money from their wallets.

The San Bruno Park School District and its board of trustees met recently to discuss a list of preliminary cuts and ways to raise money as a result of the statewide budget slashing, board President Skip Henderson said.

Officials from the district, which serves about 2,600 students in seven elementary schools and one middle school, will consider putting a parcel tax before voters at its March 12 meeting.

School district board member Russ Hanley said the situation is frustrating because the $30 million the district received from the sale of the Sandburg school site last year is earmarked for capital improvements and cannot be used to prevent the budget cuts.

A recent survey conducted by the district indicated that 78 percent of respondents would be in favor of putting the tax before voters.

“I’ve been saying it for years — there’s no reason why you shouldn’t talk about a parcel tax,” Hanley said. “My feeling is, let the people of the city decide.”

The cuts will affect the district’s staff more than the students, Hutt said. A list of possible reductions include a 50 percent cut to both Hutt and his chief business official’s positions, and the elimination of a principal, an assistant principal and an assistant superintendent. Those five cuts would save the district $556,147.

Reducing the special-education program by 15 percent would save $342,243 and removing the district’s food services director would save another $104,800.

“There are a lot of employees of the district that will lose their jobs or [take pay cuts],” Flynn said.

Another potential source of revenue may come from the old Engvall school site.

The district is leasing the former middle school site to a golfing range and will discuss alternative uses for the property at its March 12 meeting. An apartment complex proposal for the site was proposed in February.

mrosenberg@examiner.com

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