A new way to find man’s lost best friend

When the human companions of Kody, a brown Havanese dog, left for vacation last summer, he was dropped off at San Mateo resident Connie Weiss’s house. But, later that day, when a visitor came over, Kody bolted out the door, down the block and into unknown territory.

Thus began the great search for Kody: a search that involved many friends, family and even some strangers, a search that started in the afternoon and lasted past midnight, a search that was — thanks to police, shelter workers and dog-lovers — eventually successful.

Unknown to Weiss at the time, the search also would inspire a business venture. After Kody was found by police on busy Highway 92, taken to a shelter and returned to the grateful arms of his caregivers, Weiss and her friends couldn’t help but think that there needed to be more tools to help owners reunite with their lost pets.

About six months later, PetALERTZ was launched on Weiss’s new Web site, MyPetStreet.com.

PetALERTZ is intended to be a tool to help people alert a neighborhood of a lost — or found — pet. Pet owners register their pets online, posting updated photos and information.

If a pet is lost or stolen, the owner can go online and send out an alert. All other registrants in the zip code will receive the message to be on the lookout for the pet.

The alert will also be sent to a humane society shelter, where the lost-and-found division will compare the poster with the animals that have been recently found.

Though Weiss plans to eventually make the program a national one, the plan is starting locally. Weiss has partnered with the Peninsula Humane Society and Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals to get the word out about the new tool.

Humane Society spokesman Scott Delucchi said the idea is a good one, and said the shelter will begin giving out information about PetALERTZ with their new adoption kits and to people who are searching for lost pets.

He said the shelter picks up between 6,000 and 7,000 stray pets a year, and gets several visits or calls from distressed pet owners every day. Though he stressed that the new tool shouldn’t be used alone — a visit to the shelter is also needed — he said it could be very useful in getting more eyes out in search of the pet.

“We want to support any tool out there that could help people in that awful situation of having lost their pet,” he said. “We see far more of them than anybody else. We see it every single day.”

kworth@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

The sidewalk on Egbert Avenue in the Bayview recently was cluttered with car parts, tires and other junk. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
New surveillance effort aims to crack down on illegal dumping

’We want to make sure we catch people who are trashing our streets’

The recall election for California Gov. Gavin Newsom is scheduled for Sept. 14. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
SF could play a big role in overcoming Democrat apathy, driving voter turnout for Newsom

San Francisco voters are not used to swaying elections. Just think of… Continue reading

Health care workers treat a Covid-19 patient who needs to be intubated before being put on a ventilator at Providence St. Mary Medical Center during a surge of cases in Apple Valley, Dec. 17, 2020. Confronted with surging infections, California became the first state in the country to mandate coronavirus vaccines or testing for state employees and health-care workers. (Ariana Drehsler/The New York Times)
In California, a mix of support and resistance to new vaccine rules

By Shawn Hubler, Livia Albeck-Ripka and Soumya Karlamangla New York Times SACRAMENTO… Continue reading

Dave Hodges, pastor at Zide Door, the Church of Entheogenic Plants that include marijuana and psilocybin mushrooms, holds some psychedelic mushrooms inside the Oakland church on Friday, July 22, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Psychedelic spirituality: Inside a growing Bay Area religious movement

‘They are guiding us into something ineffable’

Most Read