8 Washington opponent claims city misused resources

Courtesy RenderingVoters will be asked in November 2013

Courtesy RenderingVoters will be asked in November 2013

An opponent of the 8 Washington St. waterfront luxury condo development is calling for an investigation into whether Port of San Francisco officials misused city resources for political purposes.

Jon Golinger, who is running the campaign in support of a referendum on the development, sent a letter Sept. 19 to City Attorney Dennis Herrera requesting that he investigate the claims, providing him with an Aug. 6 email sent by Port Commission Chairwoman Doreen Woo Ho to Port Director Monique Moyer.

Golinger wrote that Ho’s email “is an apparent violation of California state law prohibiting city agency officials from using public resources to oppose ballot measures or engage in unauthorized political campaign activity.”

Ho, a Mayor Ed Lee appointee, emailed Moyer requesting Port staff “recommend to the commission how we can help defeat this ballot measure and what strategy/structure can we employ within proper guidelines,” according to Golinger’s letter.

In response, Moyer replied via her city email account: “Yes, we are talking about that and how to handle the litigation although we have to defer to the City attorney on the latter.”

Both the City Attorney’s Office and the Port declined to comment.

“We cannot confirm nor deny the existence of an investigation,” Herrera’s spokesman Jack Song said Thursday.

In June, the Board of Supervisors approved the development in an 8-3 vote, with supervisors David Campos, John Avalos and board President David Chiu voting against it. But Golinger, who is chairman of the influential Telegraph Hill Dwellers neighborhood group, helped lead a signature petition drive to force a referendum.

Voters will be asked in November 2013, or perhaps during an earlier special election, if The City should allow the development to increase its height from 84 feet to 136 feet.

jsabatini@sfexaminer.com

Bay Area NewsDennis HerreraGovernment & PoliticsLocalPoliticsSan Francisco

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