$6.8M bicycle, pedestrian corridor construction to begin at McLaren Park

A $6.8 million yearlong project will transform half of a busy four-lane road in San Francisco’s McLaren Park into two lanes of designated bicycle and pedestrian only pathways starting this month.

The groundbreaking ceremony for the Mansell Street Corridor Improvement Project was held today and construction is slated to begin next week.

The infrastructure project will place vehicles on one side of a wooded median and pedestrians and cyclists on the other, and will also update signage, crosswalks, and bring flashing beacons to major intersections in the area.

This project will also incorporate bioswales, broad ditches used to catch and filter stormwater runoff and decrease flooding potential.

The improvements to the roadway aim to prioritize pedestrian and cyclist safety on Mansell Street between University Street and Brazil Avenue as well as a small stretch of Persia Avenue between Brazil Avenue and Dublin Street, according to San Francisco Recreation and Park Department.

Situated in the southern portion of the city, McLaren Park is the second largest park in the city, after Golden Gate Park.

With the Bayview and Visitacion Valley neighborhoods to the east and the Excelsior and Crocker Amazon neighborhoods to the west, McLaren Park serves as one of the few large green spaces in the area.

The changes to the park’s infrastructure are also likely to help improve the park’s reputation, which has been scarred by numerous homicides, acts of violence and traffic collisions over the years.

In May, 18-year-old Balboa High School student Jonathan Sauceda Caballero, was fatally shot at the park and in June, 23-year-old bicyclist and San Francisco resident Donald Pinkerton-DeVito, died in a collision with a marked police patrol vehicle in the park.

When the Mansell Street Corridor Improvement Project is completed in late 2016, not only will cyclists and pedestrians experience a safe, dedicated pathway, but drivers will also notice newly paved roads and reduced vehicular speeds, according to San Francisco Recreation and Park officials.

San Francisco District 10 Supervisor Malia Cohen said this streetscape improvement project “is a transformative project that will build stronger connections with neighborhoods that utilize Mansell and border
McLaren Park.”

Cohen said residents surrounding the park deserve to see these safety improvements in their neighborhood.

The project, a partnership between the San Francisco County Transportation Authority, San Francisco Public Works, the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, and the San Francisco Recreation and Park Department, aims to create better infrastructure that will encourage more people to bicycle and walk in the park, free from fears of speeding vehicles.

District 11 Supervisor John Avalos, whose district includes the western edge of McLaren Park, said he is looking forward to riding his bike on the new cycling path in the fall.

The $6.8 million in funding secured for the project came from vehicle registration fees, gasoline tax revenue and the city’s half-cent tax for transportation funds, as well as grants from One Bay Area and the California Urban Greening program and the 2012 Clean and Safe Neighborhood Parks Bond, according to SF Rec and Park officials.

Just Posted

ose Pak and Willie Brown at an event in 2014. 
Rose Pak and Willie Brown at an event in 2014.
Willie and Rose: An alliance for the ages

How the Mayor and Chinatown activist shaped San Francisco, then and now

San Francisco supervisors are considering plans to replace trash cans — a “Renaissance” garbage can is pictured on Market Street — with pricey, unnecessary upgrades. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
San Francisco must end ridiculous and expensive quest for ‘pretty’ trash cans

SF’s unique and pricey garbage bins a dream of disgraced former Public Works director

Giants right fielder Mike Yastrzemski is pictured at bat on July 29 against the Dodgers at Oracle Park; the teams are in the top spots in their league as the season closes. (Chris Victorio/Special to The Examiner)
With playoff positions on the line, old rivalries get new life

Giants cruised through season, Dodgers not far behind

Golden Gate Park visitors may take a survey about options regarding private car access on John F. Kennedy Drive, which has been the subject of controversy during the pandemic.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)</ins>
Your chance to weigh in: Should JFK remain closed to cars?

Host of mobility improvements for Golden Gate Park proposed

Drivers gathered to urge voters to reject an initiative that would exempt Uber, Lyft, and other gig economy companies from state labor laws, in San Francisco in October 2020. (Jim Wilson/New York Times)
What’s the role of unions in the 21st century?

As membership declines in California, economic inequality increases

Most Read