311 flooded with Muni calls

Call volume to San Francisco’s 311 center have increased by 40 percent since Muni’s service changes took effect Saturday, according to Mayor Gavin Newsom and transit chief Nathaniel Ford.

The schedule changes are the most extensive in 30 years and are designed to make operations more efficient and save the cash-strapped transit agency $3.2 million annually.

More than 60 percent of transit lines have been altered, with many passengers seeing service expanded, reduced or eliminated entirely.

Since the changes took effect, the 311 call center has been flooded with calls, Newsom told reporters this morning. They aren’t all calling to complain – some riders just want information on the changes, Ford said.

And while some riders have expressed anger over alterations to their usual bus route, “we have not received complaints about the quality of service or the route structure,” Ford said.

A lot of the calls to 311 about Muni have come as the result of malfunctioning signage at bus and streetcar stops, transit officials said.

NextMuni has not yet fully adjusted to the schedule changes, so digital signs telling passengers when the next bus will come have in some cases been wrong, they said.

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