3-Minute Interview: Thomas Blake

The co-director of “Point Break Live!” is in The City for the San Francisco installment of the “full-immersion stage production” of the 1991 film starring Keanu Reeves and Patrick Swayze. The show recently began what is expected to be at least a two-month run at the Xenodrome. Tickets are $25 and are available at www.theatermania.com or by calling (866) 811-4111.

The production debuted in Seattle in 2003. How did it get started? It was basically a bar bet. The two creators [Jaime Keeling and Jamie Hook] were talking about how much they loved the movie and joked about doing it on stage. And it’s evolved from there.

There are some big action scenes in the movie. How do you account for those? We do it all — the skydiving, surfing and robbery. We pride ourselves on being low budget, and I don’t want to give anything away. But it’s all in there.

Every night you have fans audition in front of the rest of the crowd with the winner playing the Keanu Reeves “Johnny Utah” protagonist role. Is that stressful? People think it’s a big risk, but it always works out. They read the lines from cue cards and they get that perfect “deer in the headlights” Keanu look. Or they really nail it, and that’s great, too. You can’t go wrong.

Who is the most memorable Johnny Utah you’ve had? We’ve actually had the writer of the movie “Point Break” get up twice to audition in front of the crowd in L.A. to try to get the role, and the second time he brought 60 people for his birthday. He didn’t get chosen either time [laughs]. But all of them are different and so fun in their own way.

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