3-Minute Interview: Scott Thompson

The member of the Kids in the Hall, a popular Canadian sketch comedy group formed nearly 20 years ago, is joining up with the other members for a couple nights at this weekend’s SF Sketchfest at the Palace of Fine Arts Theatre.

Why did the Kids in the Hall choose this city to have a special performance? Because we were asked. We’re going to be doing a tour starting in March so this is a perfect opportunity to try out our material and have our egos stroked a little bit. We’re also here for the weather.

New material, eh? Everything we’re doing is new. … Like one sketch called “Hateful Baby” about a couple that have a baby and find out they hate it. … Another sketch about a gay couple visiting another couple that has a Canadian marriage. It’s still all about relationships. And some old characters with new monologues.

What impact do you think the Kids in the Hall have had? I would say we’ve had the same impact as the persimmon, though we’ve dreamed of having the impact of the kiwi.

What do you think of the political scene in San Francisco? I don’t know it. Fabulous. Absolutely fabulous. It’s yellow with black trim.

They are making a film about the life of Harvey Milk … That’s not possible, because they didn’t contact me yet. Who is it that contacted you? You too have had this dream? That’s not possible.

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