3-Minute Interview: Sarah Ferguson

The Duchess of York and spokeswoman for Weight Watchers has written the forward to a new Weight Watchers book, “Start Living, Start Losing,” a compilation of sometimes poignant, sometimes funny stories about members’ experiences of slimming down. During a recent visit to the United States, she took a few minutes to chat on the phone about healthy living and eating.

How long have you been on Weight Watchers? Eleven years.

Why do you think the program works? It’s not a diet, it’s a lifestyle. You can eat foods you want. I wish I were a 6-foot blonde with big bosoms and tight jeans and could meet George Clooney at the corner. But I’m not. It’s great to know that Weight Watchers is there to pick up the pieces.

What’s your advice for people trying to maintain a healthy weight? Keep the water up; you’re a table leg. Keep a mind-body balance, exercise, watch the portion size and seek support and guidance.

What’s your favorite food? Salami, prosciutto, Parmesan cheese and a glass of wine in Italy.

Do you cook? No. I don’t get near the oven. I do tend to use balsamic vinegar to add flavor to foods that are bland and boring.

Are there any parallels between your role as children’s author and your work with Weight Watchers? The key tolife is to inspire people to make changes, and to keep a child’s eye on things.

You’ve been known as Fergie, but there’s a popular singer today named Fergie. How do you feel about that? I think it’s great now. But when she sold an album called “The Dutchess,” I thought that was very naughty. So I asked her to do a charity concert for me, and she did.

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