3-Minute Interview: Sage Drake

The San Bruno resident entered a 17-minute children’s film called “My Gift” into the San Francisco International Children’s Film Festival on Feb. 24. Now the filmmaker is entering the children’s film into festivals in the Bay Area, Los Angeles, Chicago, San Diego and more. He studied film at the College of San Mateo in 1997.

Tell me about your movie, “My Gift.” It’s a story of a homeless old man who hitchhikes to a small town, and along the way he meets a lost dog and both of them find a new lease on life.

What is it you love about filmmaking? I just like the idea that you can just make something where you can get a bunch of strangers in a room to look at your work and they can respond to it differently. I like the idea where you can take two hours, or even 17 minutes in this case, and you can change their lives forever.

Did you always want to make films? I’ve had this love of going to the movies since I was a little kid. “Star Wars” inspired me — I saw a documentary on how it was made and I thought, “God, I have to do that.” Just to be part of movie making seemed exciting.

Do you have a day job, too? I’m doing this as a full-time thing. I’ve been working as a videographer, editor, and I’ve done weddings and independent music videos. It’s stressful, but I do enjoy it. If you don’t enjoy the process, it’s just going to make you go crazy.

How long does it take you to complete a film? If a story is really, really hot, I just flush out the draft really quickly. I shot [“My Gift”] in less than two days.

How do you get your inspiration? Usually when I write I don’t force myself. SomehowI have these little images pop up in my head and I just jot them down, and try not to worry about whether it connects.

mrosenberg@examiner.com

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