3-Minute Interview: Peter Gilmore

The San Mateo resident enters Sunday’s ING Bay to Breakers as perhaps the Bay Area’s best hope to cross the finish line first. The 31-year-old will be participating in the famous footrace for the fifth time.

As a professional runner, what draws you to Bay to Breakers? There’s definitely something cool about being a part of the big, local race. And this one always draws a great field and definitely incorporates the culture of San Francisco.

Do you ever wish you could stop and enjoy the scene a little more? Yeah, I’ve gone back through the course after running, and it’s been an ugly picture. One of these years, I’ll have to jog it and check everything out.

What is your training schedule like throughout the year? As I get ready for a marathon, I’m typically running 140 to 150 miles per week. But for a shorter race like Bay to Breakers, I cut down on the distance and try to concentrate on speed workouts.

Where do you like to train? I go pretty much every day to Sawyer Camp Trail, which runs along Crystal Springs. It’s close to home, it’s got every half-mile marked off, you can run on dirt or pavement and there’s no dogs or horses. And it’s beautiful.

What is your goal for this year’s race? I haven’t really thought about a time — it’s more of a place thing in this race. I’d be satisfied to be in the top five, with the real goal being the top three. There are always some outstanding runners that are tough to beat, but once you get in that first group, you never know.images.

melliser@sfexaminer.com

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