3-Minute Interview: Linda Squires-Grohe

The dean of City College of San Francisco’s School of Health and Physical Education is the recipient of The California Wellness Foundation’s Champion of Health Professions Diversity Award. She has worked at City College for 39 years.

Why are community colleges so important? Because the door of education is shut to many, many students for a number of different circumstances. Education is the one thing that can level the playing field, and community college means educational access to all.

What are some of the health programs you’ve helped create while at CCSF? We’ve begun an emergency medical technician program at Galileo High School, where students can get high school and college credit for taking a medical terminology class. It gives the students employment opportunities, and it gives them the experience of being a college student. We’ve also started a program called the Welcome Back Center, which retrains Bay Area citizens who were medical-care professionals in different countries.

How does it feel to be recognized by The California Wellness Foundation for your work? It’s fantastic. I’ve been an educator all these years because I really believe in education, not just for students, but for society at large. To have my work being recognized is very rewarding and I feel very honored, although I’ve had a lot of help from so many wonderful department chairs during my career.

Ever consider moving on from City College of San Francisco? No. I’ve made a commitment to CCSF and I’m really a believer in what we do. I’m surrounded by great workers and wonderful students. I couldn’t ask for a better situation.

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