3-Minute Interview: Josh Fix

The San Francisco-based singer-songwriter, who abandoned a career in banking after music-industry insiders admired his demo EP “Steinway the Hard Way,” has just released his debut full-length CD, “Free at Last.”

You canceled a gig scheduled for this week in San Francisco. Why? It has to do with scheduling with the guys in the band. We’ll try to get another one going in San Francisco soon.

You play all of the instruments on your CD; how do you like playing live with a band? I love it. It’s taken a long time to get to where I’m playing with guys that are this good.

You’ve lived in a lot of places; why did you move to San Francisco? I never intended to do music as a career. I came to San Francisco because it was a place for banking and advertising. I was fresh out of college, and friends said it was the place to be.

Is it true that you lived in an office filing room when you recorded your music? Yes, for about seven months. It was a very liberating lifestyle. At the time, I wanted to buy a machine to multitrack, and there was no way I could continue to pay rent and save up for that. So I got rid of most of my stuff, invested in a camp mattress and scoped out the office. I finagled my way into a position where I had some keys, and access to a filing room with a door that opened only from the inside.

What do you think when listeners compare your music with that of Elton John or Queen? It’s an amalgamation of things I like to hear; my father was obsessed with those names, and Supertramp, too. They influenced me, but I like classical and Iron Maiden, too — particularly their bass player.

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