3-Minute Interview: Beverly Mennicucci

The Burlingame woman has been a ticket vendor at the San Francisco Giants box office since 1958, when the team moved to The City from New York. She landed the job by selling tickets at Seals Stadium, the Giants’ first park, where the minor league San Francisco Seals played prior to the big league club’s arrival. In addition to Seals, she has worked at Candlestick Park, which she still calls the “new” stadium, and AT&T Park.

How much was a Giants ticket in 1958? I believe it was $3.50. They certainly weren’t how they are now.

How much are tickets now? The highest now is $110.

Why have you stayed in the Giants’ box office for so long? One year ran into another. I wasn’t intending to stay this long. There was always something new and exciting every year. I was always into baseball and the box office. Once you start something you never get away from it.

Any favorite memories from the past 50 years? Opening up Seals Stadium when The City was so excited that a major league team was coming. That was a beautiful park. I enjoyed taking walks around the ballpark and talking with the players. Also, in 1960 our box office wasn’t ready yet so we had to work in the shower room of the clubhouse.

Have you ever thought of getting another job or changing to a different position within the organization? I’ve always worked full time for the box office and I’ve always enjoyed it. I love people; I’m a people person.

Who is your favorite Giant from the past 50 years? Oh, Willie Mays, naturally. Everyone loves Willie Mays.

Do you ever think to yourself before the season that this could be your last year? I’ve been saying that for years. I always say this will be my last year. The girls [at the box office] say, “I don’t want to hear it any more.”

Bay Area NewsLocal

Just Posted

Cabernet sauvignon grapes sat in a container after being crushed at Smith-Madrone Winery in St. Helena. (Courtesy Smith-Madrone Winery)
San Francisco’s ‘Champagne problems’ — Wine industry suffers supply chain woes

‘Everywhere you turn, things that were easy are no longer easy’

Glasses behind the bar at LUNA in the Mission District on Friday, Oct. 15, 2021. Glassware is just one of the many things restaurants have had trouble keeping in stock as supply chain problems ripple outward. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
SF restaurants face product shortages and skyrocketing costs

‘The supply chain crisis has impacted us in almost every way imaginable’

A Giants fans hangs his head in disbelief after the Dodgers won the NLDS in a controversial finish to a tight Game 5. (Chris Victorio/Special to The Examiner)
Giants dream season ends at the hands of the Dodgers, 2-1

A masterful game comes down to the bottom of the ninth, and San Francisco came up short

<strong>Workers with Urban Alchemy and the Downtown Streets Team clean at Seventh and Market streets on Oct. 12. <ins>(Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins> </strong>
<ins></ins>
Why is it so hard to keep San Francisco’s streets clean?

Some blame bureaucracy, others say it’s the residents’ fault

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi — seen in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday — touted Congressional Democrats’ infrastructure bill in San Francisco on Thursday. (Stefani Reynolds/The New York Times)
Pelosi touts infrastructure bill as it nears finish line

Climate change, social safety net among major priorities of Democrats’ 10-year funding measure

Most Read