3-Minute Interview: Barbara Rodgers

The broadcasting veteran retired from CBS 5 on Friday after working at the television station since 1979. Rodgers anchored weekend newscasts from 1987 to 2000 and lately has been assigned to co-anchor the “News at Noon.”

What will you miss most? All the new people that I meet and get to interview. The scope of this job is so broad. I was just saying to someone this morning that one of the calls I received when news of my retirement went out was from the guys at San Quentin. From the guys at San Quentin to interviewingBush One in the White House, that’s what I’ll miss most is the range of emotions.

What won’t you miss? I think I won’t miss the day-to-day deadline. In this business, you’re always on a time clock. You’re really tethered to the clock in television, much more so than in print. I won’t miss having my life so controlled by the time clock. I also have estimated that I’ve eaten more lunches on my lap in the van than I have at a table.

What was your favorite story that you covered? Clearly the month I spent in South Africa, getting to meet Nelson Mandela, Bishop [Desmond] Tutu. That was the defining part of my career, in terms of an assignment. I would pinch myself every day.

What is something people don’t know about your job? One misconception people really have, especially of television news, is that television reporters are not serious journalists — that we’re just into looking cute on TV.

What are your plans? I don’t call it retirement. I was trying to think of the best word for it because retirement sounds like playing golf and sitting on the beach. I call it career realignment.

Bay Area NewsLocal

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Giants 5-4 loss to Padres a tough finish to a surprisingly strong season

By Gideon Rubin Special to The Examiner Austin Slater lifted his helmet… Continue reading

Family, friends and police search for missing veteran with head injury

Abraham Isaac Siliezar, 56, is an at-risk missing person with multiple medical conditions

Tenderloin merchants, residents come together over street closures

Parts of Larkin, Golden Gate to close four days a week to promote outdoor business, dining

Bring on the map makeover

White supremacists’ names being removed from parks and monuments

Enter ‘The Matrix’: Drive-in movies during a pandemic

Though it’s fun to take in a film and drink, I miss watching bartenders make cocktails

Most Read