eric sun/Special to the S.F. Examiner

eric sun/Special to the S.F. Examiner

24 people arrested for public intoxication at Bay to Breakers

At least 24 people were arrested for public intoxication and nearly 11 tons of trash collected at San Francisco's annual Bay to Breakers foot race Sunday, police said.

Police Officer Albie Esparza said that at least two felony narcotics arrests and at least one misdemeanor narcotics arrest were made along the race route.

One person was also arrested during an incident at the bison paddock in Golden Gate Park, Esparza said.

Three citations were issued to people for urinating in public and four quality of life citations were also issued, Esparza said.

The San Francisco Department of Public Works reported via Twitter Sunday afternoon that their crews wrapped up their clean-up efforts around 3 p.m., collecting about 10 1/2 tons of trash on the race route.

That does not include trash left on surrounding streets, in public parks and on private property.

At least three injured people were taken to the hospital for treatment, a low number compared to the roughly 40,000 people who

participated in the 7.46-mile race, city Department of Emergency Management spokesman Francis Zamora said.

Owners of the race, the Wasserman Media Group, estimated that about 100,000 spectators also would show up along the race route.

The Bay to Breakers race through city streets debuted in San Francisco in 1912. It runs from Howard Street and The Embarcadero downtown west past Golden Gate Park to Great Highway at Ocean Beach.

Police are expected to release final tallies of arrests, injuries, runners who were stopped due to nudity and other information on Monday, according to Esparza.

Prior to the race, the Wasserman Media Group announced a 20 percent increase in security personnel and the installation of extra fencing along the route this year to ensure the safety of racers.

About 25 percent more portable toilets lined the route Sunday than last year in an effort to prevent participants from relieving themselves on city streets, the group said.

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