A building at 1269 Howard St. was purchased by La Casa de las Madres, a nonprofit that offers shelter and support services to women, teens and children exposed to and at risk of abuse and domestic violence, using funds made available by The City. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

A building at 1269 Howard St. was purchased by La Casa de las Madres, a nonprofit that offers shelter and support services to women, teens and children exposed to and at risk of abuse and domestic violence, using funds made available by The City. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)

$1M grant to provide domestic violence organization with permanent drop-in center

One of San Francisco’s longest running resource centers for survivors of domestic violence will now have a permanent drop-in center, thanks to a $1 million grant from the city’s Office of Economic and Workforce Development.

La Casa de las Madres has operated its drop-in counseling center for more than 20 years, although the center has moved three times as the program continues to grow and needs more space. Through the economic and workforce development office’s Nonprofit Sustainability Initiative, however, the drop-in center will now operate permanently out of 1269 Howard St.

The expansive new space will help La Casa de las Madres continue providing services for women and children affected by domestic violence, without having to deal with the high cost of real estate in the city.

“Each year I hear from nonprofits like La Casa de las Madres whose high rents put their services at risk. With support from my Nonprofit Sustainability Initiative, organizations helping women, children and other vulnerable people have secured more than 100,000 square feet of newly nonprofit-owned space to ensure access to their services for years to come,” Mayor London Breed said in a statement.

“La Casa de las Madres is ending the cycle of domestic violence through crisis response, support services and prevention, and I’m glad the City is able to support them so they can continue their important work,” she said.

“With rents continuing to rise in San Francisco, having the space to support the thousands of survivors of domestic violence each year was becoming increasingly difficult,” said La Casa’s Executive Director Kathy Black. “With the help of the Nonprofit Sustainability Initiative, survivors and their children will always have a safe place to turn when they need it most.”

In addition to the drop-in center, La Casa also operates a 24-hour emergency shelter, two crisis lines, a text line, and is equipped with advocates within the San Francisco Housing Authority, the San Francisco Police Department’s special victims unit, the Mary Elizabeth Inn and some San Francisco Unified School District high schools.

Joaquin Torres, the director of the Office of Economic and Workforce Development said, “We are proud to support this acquisition that enables La Casa to stay rooted in the community they serve and provide more life-saving services to survivors escaping the cycle of domestic violence.”

Bay Area Newssan francisco news

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Advocates with the San Francisco Public Bank Coalition hold a rally outside City Hall before the Board of Supervisors were to vote on a resolution supporting the creation of a public banking charter on Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2019. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Should San Francisco run its own public bank? The debate returns

Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, momentum was building for San Francisco to… Continue reading

Apprenticeship instructor Mike Miller, center, demonstrates how to set up a theodolite, a hyper-sensitive angle measuring device, for apprentices Daniel Rivas, left, Ivan Aguilar, right, and Quetzalcoatl Orta, far right, at the Ironworkers Local Union 377 training center in Benicia on June 10, 2021. (Photo by Anne Wernikoff, CalMatters)
California’s affordable housing crisis: Are labor union requirements in the way?

By Manuela Tobias CalMatters California lawmakers introduced several bills this year that… Continue reading

People fish at a dock at Islais Creek Park on Thursday, June 10, 2021. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
What Islais Creek tells us about rising sea levels in San Francisco

Islais Creek is an unassuming waterway along San Francisco’s eastern industrial shoreline,… Continue reading

Organizer Jas Florentino, left, explains the figures which represent 350 kidnapped Africans first sold as slaves in the United States in 1619 in sculptor Dana King’s “Monumental Reckoning.” The installation is in the space of the former Francis Scott Key monument in Golden Gate Park. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
What a reparations program would look like in The City

‘If there’s any place we can do it, it’s San Francisco’

Officer Joel Babbs, pictured at a protest outside the Hall of Justice in 2017, is representing himself in an unusually public police misconduct matter. <ins>(Courtesy Bay City News)</ins>
The strange and troubling story of Joel Babbs: What it tells us about the SFPD

The bizarre and troubling career of a whistle-blowing San Francisco police officer… Continue reading

Most Read