Your tax dollars at work: National Science Foundation gives $700K grant to theater company for play on climate change

One in 10 Americans are out of work, and this how the National Science Foundation is spending your money:

The National Science Foundation has awarded a $700,000 grant to the Civilians, a New York theater company, to finance the production of a show about climate change. “The Great Immensity,” with a book by Steven Cosson (“This Beautiful City”) and music and lyrics by Michael Friedman (“Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson”), tells the story of Polly, a photojournalist who disappears while working in the rain forests of Panama. The grant is a rare gift to an arts organization from the foundation, a federal agency that pays for science, engineering and mathematics research and education. The company says it plans to spend the money on the development and evaluation of the show, as well as on a tour and educational programs, including post-show panel discussions with experts in related scientific fields. No performance dates have been announced.

You know, you were probably just bemoaning that we haven’t spent enough money educating the public about global warming. Let’s hope this play is better than the last big global warming propaganda campaign.

Beltway Confidentialenvironmentalistsglobal warmingUS

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