You know who was a big loser in this election? George Soros.

While Democrats went out of their way to portray the Koch brothers as evil billionaires puppeteering this election, I’d venture they feel pretty good about the outcome. However, after last night I’d venture that that George Soros is one unhappy Hungarian.

Where the Kochs stood accused of funding some well-known grassroots political groups, Soros has been heavily invested in some pretty shady attempts at electioneering for Democrats. And fortunately, these efforts aren’t going very well.

The first notable thing is Soros’ funding of the Secretary of State Project — which is basically an attempt to elect Secretaries of State around the country willing to impose Democratic-friendly election laws in an attempt to tilt the playing field in their favor on election day.

Well, yesterday Republicans won 17 of 26 races for Secretary of State taking six of those offices (Arkansas, Ohio, New Mexico, Colorado, Iowa and Kansas) from Democrats. Republicans now control 25 offices to Democrats 22.

And then there was Soros’ backing of a measure in California to put control of redistricting back in the hands of the state legislature, a move that would obviously benefit Democrats. It failed, while another measure to give California’s Citizens Redistricting Commission increased authority over redrawing congressional districts succeeded:

California voters approved a ballot measure financed largely by Charles Munger Jr., son of Berkshire Hathaway Inc.’s Charles Munger, that strips California lawmakers of responsibility for drawing the boundaries of congressional districts.

Proposition 20 was winning 65 percent to 35 percent, with 17 percent of precincts counted, according to the Associated Press. The measure puts the task of reshaping the districts represented by California’s 53 members of the House of Representatives into the hands of a Citizens Redistricting Commission.

Proposition 27, a competing measure backed by billionaire George Soros, unions and Democratic Party leaders to disband the commission and return districting powers to lawmakers, was losing, 61 percent to 39 percent.

I’m sure Soros will keep pushing his agenda, but for now, two big ticket items of his have been stymied.

Beltway Confidentialelection 2010George SorosUS

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