You know politicians are in trouble . . .

. . . when they start saying that they need to get their message out better. We saw this with Republicans in 2006, 2007 and 2008, and we’re seeing it with Democrats now, as indicated in this article in Politico on how Democrats are alarmed by their poor ratings from Independent voters. “Quite frankly,” the chairwoman of the Colorado Democratic party is quoted as saying, “we’ve got to do a better job of messaging.” “This is what is particularly heartbreaking,” says the pollster for Democratic House of Delegates candidates in Virginia. “It’s a real problem for messaging for us.”

“Quite frankly” is the sort of thing politicians of both parties say when they are being quite frank with us, and “heartbreaking” is what political consultants say when they are unable to come up with a successful strategy (Democrats lost six seats in the Virginia House of Delegates last month). But some of those quoted show more sense. “I think it’s about action and not words right now,” says a pollster for the Pew Research Center. “The public wants to see action.” Of course, that may depend on what kind of action.
 

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