Wind welfare and the Google Boondoggle in Maryland

I would love clean, domestic, renewable power as much as the next guy, but if you need any evidence that our current alternative energy sources aren't up to snuff, just look at how much they get in terms of subsidies.

This week, at Beltway Confidential's sister blog, Examiner Opinion Zone, Maryland blogger Mark Newgent discusses a new boondoggle on the table in Annapolis:

The Pinsky-Hucker bill would support both renewable energy and an expansion of the wind-generated power industry in the state. Renewable energy proponents say that the only way developers can get financing for wind farms that can cost billions is through long-term contracts that guarantee a revenue stream.

Indeed, as renewable energy is more costly to generate and transmit versus fossil fuels, it is viable only through government subsidies and mandates.

Here’s where Google comes in.  Back in October, Google and it’s partners announced with much fanfare a $5 billion project to transmit offshore wind power to the Mid-Atlantic region. Google has a 37.5percent stake in the project.

I highly recommend Newgent's entire post, and that you make it a habit in the New Year to visit Opinion Zone, where we have a great stable of voices bringing insight, analysis, reporting, and of course opinion, to all sorts of issues.

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