Will Congress and Citigroup fund ACORN again?

Matthew Vadum, who's been aggressively covering the ACORN story, notes that Congress may be gearing up to fund the corrupt community organizing group again. The organization's current federal funding ban expires December 18:

On Tuesday evening the House Appropriations Committee rejected on a party line vote of 9 to 5 an amendment offered by Rep. Tom Latham (R-Iowa) that would have blocked federal funding of the radical advocacy group.

The amendment was needed because the Obama administration thumbed its nose at a provision in spending legislation that banned ACORN funding until the end of next week.

In a ruling revealed late last month by the Justice Department the Obama administration invented a loophole allowing the government to continue funding the president's friends at ACORN. Through the magic of legal interpretation, the language forbidding funding the group was transformed by Acting Assistant Attorney General David J. Barron into a requirement not “to refuse payment on binding contractual obligations that predate” the original funding ban.

Latham's amendment would have closed the loophole by banning funding for ACORN, including any funding covering “a contract or other agreement entered into before the date of the enactment of this or any such other Act.”
 

The Examiner has previously editorialized againstthis disconcerting Justice Department ruling. Vadum does note that “ACORN funding prohibition language remains in the massive fiscal 2010 spending measure taken up by appropriators” but that the Justice Department's ruling essentially amounts to a bailout for the organization which had been considering filing bankruptcy before Christmas.

Finally, Vadum wonders whether Citigroup is gearing up to fund ACORN again as well. The bank has given ACORN millions of dollars over the years via its charitable foundation, and despite clear evidence the group was systematically willing to enable tax evasion and underage sex-trafficking, the bank would not make a permanent decision about funding the group. The Examiner previously noted Citigroup's CEO said the decision to fund the group “completely depends” on the results of ACORN's internal audit. And as expected, the results of ACORN's internal audit appear to be a whitewash of the organization's crimes.

Beltway ConfidentialUS

If you find our journalism valuable and relevant, please consider joining our Examiner membership program.
Find out more at www.sfexaminer.com/join/

Just Posted

Giants second baseman Donovan Solano scores on a double in the seventh inning against the Dodgers at Oracle Park on July 29. (Chris Victorio/Special to The Examiner)
Will the Giants make the playoffs? Kris Bryant may be the answer

By Chris Haft Special to The Examiner You’d be hard-pressed to find… Continue reading

Tiffany Carter, owner of Boug Cali West Coast Creole Shack in San Francisco’s La Cocina Marketplace, was dismayed by gentrification she found when she returned to her hometown to start a business. (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
SF Black Wallstreet: Helping residents build wealth, reclaim spaces they’ve had to leave

Tiffany Carter moved back to her hometown of San Francisco five years… Continue reading

A prescribed fire at Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks was conducted in June 2016 to reduce hazardous fuel loading, increase watershed health, and restore the natural fire cycle in the Redwood Canyon area ecosystem. (Photo courtesy Rebecca Paterson/National Park Service)
Experts, UC scientists discuss wildfires in the state’s riskiest regions

Wildfires are nothing new in California’s history, but the magnitude and frequencies… Continue reading

Fourth-grade students at Lucerne Valley Elementary School don masks and Western wear for a “Walk Through California” history day during in-person instruction. (Courtesy of Krystal Nelson)
Confusion over mask mandate for California schools sparks tension between districts and parents

By Diana Lambert EdSource Shifting rules around mask mandates at schools are… Continue reading

In his extensive filming of The City during the pandemic, Eric Goodfield said he has been “observing how the environment affects the behavior of people.” (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)
Filmmaker Eric Goodfield fixes lens on SF’s COVID days

140 days of shooting in The City made for ‘greatest adventure’

Most Read