Will Congress and Citigroup fund ACORN again?

Matthew Vadum, who's been aggressively covering the ACORN story, notes that Congress may be gearing up to fund the corrupt community organizing group again. The organization's current federal funding ban expires December 18:

On Tuesday evening the House Appropriations Committee rejected on a party line vote of 9 to 5 an amendment offered by Rep. Tom Latham (R-Iowa) that would have blocked federal funding of the radical advocacy group.

The amendment was needed because the Obama administration thumbed its nose at a provision in spending legislation that banned ACORN funding until the end of next week.

In a ruling revealed late last month by the Justice Department the Obama administration invented a loophole allowing the government to continue funding the president's friends at ACORN. Through the magic of legal interpretation, the language forbidding funding the group was transformed by Acting Assistant Attorney General David J. Barron into a requirement not “to refuse payment on binding contractual obligations that predate” the original funding ban.

Latham's amendment would have closed the loophole by banning funding for ACORN, including any funding covering “a contract or other agreement entered into before the date of the enactment of this or any such other Act.”
 

The Examiner has previously editorialized againstthis disconcerting Justice Department ruling. Vadum does note that “ACORN funding prohibition language remains in the massive fiscal 2010 spending measure taken up by appropriators” but that the Justice Department's ruling essentially amounts to a bailout for the organization which had been considering filing bankruptcy before Christmas.

Finally, Vadum wonders whether Citigroup is gearing up to fund ACORN again as well. The bank has given ACORN millions of dollars over the years via its charitable foundation, and despite clear evidence the group was systematically willing to enable tax evasion and underage sex-trafficking, the bank would not make a permanent decision about funding the group. The Examiner previously noted Citigroup's CEO said the decision to fund the group “completely depends” on the results of ACORN's internal audit. And as expected, the results of ACORN's internal audit appear to be a whitewash of the organization's crimes.

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