Why the underwear bomber might hurt Democrats' health care plans

Just prior to Christmas, word on the street was that Obama was going to push health care back past the State of the Union speech into February. The reason was two-fold. One, congressional Democrats need some time to get their act together on the legislation as the House was unlikely to accept the Senate bill as written. And two, the President and Congressional Democrats had taken a big hit in the polls with their obsessive focus on a tax-heavy and unpopular health care reform bill while they weren't doing anything about double-digit unemployement.

Supposedly, the plan was for the President to make what's called in political parlance a “hard pivot” on jobs in January. Obama was to start focusing on the economy and pushing a second jobs bill in the hopes of building up his political capital in the interim before returning to the contentious health care debate.

Good luck with your pivot now, Mr. President.

The media oxygen for weeks to come seems likely to focus on what even the President admits is a “catastrophic” national security failure. Even the liberal commentariat has increasingly harsh words for his administration's handling of the incident. It's doubtful that the President — and by extension the Democratic Congress — is going to emerge from the discussion untarnished in the eyes of American voters. And that might make moderate Democrats more skittish about health care reform.

Beltway ConfidentialUS

Just Posted

Pharmacist Hank Chen is known for providing personalized service at Charlie’s Pharmacy in the Fillmore.<ins> (Kevin N. Hume/The Examiner)</ins>
Left: A Walgreens at 300 Gough St. is among San Francisco stores closing.
Walgreens closures open the door for San Francisco’s neighborhood pharmacies

‘I think you’ll see more independents start to pop up’

San Franciscans are likely to have the opportunity to vote in four different elections in 2022. (Kevin N. Hume/S.F. Examiner)
Electionpalooza: SF school board recall will kick off a flurry of local races

‘It’s going to be a lot of elections and a lot of decisions for voters to make’

Four young politicos were elected to city government on the Peninsula in 2020. From left: Redwood City Councilmember Michael Smith; South San Francisco Councilmember James Coleman; Redwood City Councilmember Lissette Espinoza-Garnica; and East Palo Alto Councilmember Antonio Lopez.<ins> (Examiner illustration/Courtesy photos)</ins>
Progressive politicians rise to power on the Peninsula. Will redistricting reverse the trend?

‘There’s this wave of young people really trying to shake things up’

The Walgreens at 4645 Mission St. in The City is among those slated to close. <ins>(Courtesy photo)</ins>
Walgreens says it’s closing five San Francisco stores due to crime. Where’s the data?

Walgreens should be transparent, enlighten San Francisco leaders about crime’s effect on business

Most Read