Why does anybody not working on K Street take Trent Lott seriously anymore?

Former Senate Majority Leader and chief cheerleader for the departed Strom Thurmond Trent Lott retired from Congress earlier than expected to insure that he could have an unemcumbered hand on lobbying his former colleagues. That was 2007 and you can read all about in The New York Times.

Shortly after leaving Congress, Lott joined forces with former Louisiana Democratic Sen. John Breaux to form a powerhouse K Street lobbying firm. Lott and Breaux worked so well together that Patton Boggs, the biggest lobbyist on K Street, bought them earlier this year.

Around the same time as Patton Boggs came calling with a bucket of cash, Lott said of the Tea Party candidates seeking Senate and House seats: “We don't need a lot of Jim DeMint disciples. As soon as they get here, we need to co-opt them.”

And why am I telling you this? Because Lott today pronounced – to the surprise of nobody in the nation's capital whose body is above room temperature – that those terrible Tea Partiers are the reason why the Republicans lost Senate races in Delaware, Colorado and Nevada.

“We did not nominate our strongest candidates,” Lott said, referring Establishment Republicans who lost to Tea Party backed entrants in those three states. “With those three we would have won and been sitting at 50.”

What Lott really meant is that he would likely have had absolutely zero influence with Tea Party backed senators whereas with the Establishment-types he would have been lining his wallet with cold, hard lobbying contract cash.

Did Politico, which reported Lott's remarks in a story bylined by Jonathan Martin and Manu Raju, point out this fact? I'll bet you can guess the answer to that question.    

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