Why do environmentalists keep depicting child murder?

After last week's furor over the 10:10 ad campaign, which had school children being blown up and splattering their classmates with blood and viscera for being insufficiently committed to reducing their carbon footprint, Adam Baldwin (yes, that Adam Baldwin of Firefly/Chuck fame) unearths this advertisement from a group rather ironically called ACT-Responsible:

Incredibly, Baldwin points out that the website Treehugger, where this is included in a feature on “Coolest Environmental Advertising,” is owned by Discovery Communications, parent company of the Discovery Channel. That's the very same place that a crazed environmentalist with a radical population control agenda recently took hostages before being shot by the police. 

You can follow Adam Baldwin on Twitter here.

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