Washington Post: Hollywood's glorification of Valerie Plame and Joe Wilson is packed with falsehoods

I have to hand it to the Post on this one. This is a great example of an instance where people are not entitled to their own facts, and it's commendable that the Post noting in pretty explicit terms that Valerie Plame and Joe Wilson have a pronounced persecution complex coupled with delusions of grandeur:

“It's accurate,” Ms. Plame told The Post [about the movie Fair Game]. Said Mr. Wilson: “For people who have short memories or don't read, this is the only way they will remember that period.”

We certainly hope that is not the case. In fact, “Fair Game,” based on books by Mr. Wilson and his wife, is full of distortions – not to mention outright inventions. To start with the most sensational: The movie portrays Ms. Plame as having cultivated a group of Iraqi scientists and arranged for them to leave the country, and it suggests that once her cover was blown, the operation was aborted and the scientists were abandoned. This is simply false. In reality, as The Post's Walter Pincus and Richard Leiby reported, Ms. Plame did not work directly on the program, and it was not shut down because of her identification.

The movie portrays Mr. Wilson as a whistle-blower who debunked a Bush administration claim that Iraq had tried to purchase uranium from the African country of Niger. In fact, an investigation by the Senate intelligence committee found that Mr. Wilson's reporting did not affect the intelligence community's view on the matter, and an official British investigation found that President George W. Bush's statement in a State of the Union address that Britain believed that Iraq had sought uranium in Niger was well-founded.

The Post editorial also goes on to note that the leak about Plame first came from the State Department and was not a White House conspiracy. Read the whole thing.

Beltway Confidentialjoe wilsonUSWashington Post

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