Virginia voters to decide 3 Constitutional amendments Tuesday

Most of the attention on Tuesday’s election has been focused on Virginia’s hotly contested congressional races, but the state’s voters also will be asked to decide on three statewide ballot question.

<p>Voters will be asked whether the state constitution should be amended to allow allow property-tax relief for homeowners who are elderly or permanently disabled.

The second ballot question asks if similar property-tax relief should be provided to homeowners who serve in the military, the service member’s surviving spouse or veterans who have been permanently disabled during their service.

The third constitutional amendment on the ballot would require the state to increase the size of its budget contingency fund, or rainy day fund, from 10 percent of specific tax revenues to 15 percent. To determine how much money goes into the fund each year, the state averages the latest three years of income and retail sales taxes.

More information is available on the State Board of Elections’ website.

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