UPDATE: ‘Illegal immigrant criminals back on street, thanks to ICE’

Prince William Board chairman Corey Stewart told The Examiner that a top aide at U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement admitted to him that ICE has released more than a half million convicted criminal illegal immigrants back into American communities instead of deporting them.

Stewart also says that he is still waiting for information he requested about the whereabouts of some 2,739 criminals convicted in Prince William County since 2007 and sent to ICE for deportation. County police officers have already recaptured 249 of these felons.

Here is ICE’s response, received after deadline Tuesday:

“ICE has been in contact with Virginia law enforcement as well as state and local officials, including Mr. Stewart, on this issue. These officials are aware that ICE is currently in the process of gathering an extensive amount of information in response to their request.

“Once this information is compiled, ICE has offered to give a briefing to Mr. Stewart and his colleagues. ICE has also alerted Virginia officials to the fact that any personally identifiable information they have requested about aliens encountered by ICE in Virginia is protected under the Privacy Act and will be redacted from any materials shared by ICE.”

So the federal agency whose main mission is to enforce federal immigration law is not only releasing convicted criminals who entered the U.S. illegally and victimized American citizens back into local communities, it’s now in the business of protecting the “privacy rights” of these felons and refusing to share “personally identifiable information” with duly elected local officials and law enforcement.

Draw your own conclusions.

Beltway ConfidentialPrince William CountyU.S. Immigration and Customs EnforcementUS

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