Union corruption at the New York Times

This morning, police raided the printing plant of the New York Times on charges of union corruption. From the paper's own website:

The police raided the printing plant of The New York Times on Tuesday morning as part of what appeared to be a larger investigation into the union that delivers newspapers in the metropolitan area.

A warrant was served at the newspaper’s printing plant in College Point, Queens, by New York City police officers working in conjunction with the office of the Manhattan district attorney, Robert M. Morgenthau, as investigators sought paperwork related to the work of the Newspaper and Mail Deliverers Union, which bundles and trucks newspapers across the region.

And curiously, the Times observes:

Allegations of corruption and connections to organized crime are not new to the union, which has historically wielded enormous power over the news companies that rely on its truck drivers to deliver hundreds of thousands of papers ever day. Messages left at the union’s headquarters in Long Island City were not immediately returned.

Given the Times' admission that they are familiar with union corruption on an ongoing and intimate basis, you'd think the paper might be more interested in reporting on the topic.

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